The Symposium at BOTANICAL!

Saturday, April 14, 2018 - 9:00am to 1:30pm

 

SCHEDULE:

9 a.m. - REGISTRATION & COFFEE
10 a.m. - WELCOME & INTRODUCTIONS - Tulsa Botanic Garden and Robert McKeown (Oxford Food Symposiast)
10:20 a.m. - KEYNOTE SPEAKERS:

· Enlightened Gardening with Carolin Young -  How Two 17th-century French Gardens Changed Western Cuisine

Carolin Young will bring you tales of two fabulous 17th c French gardens - what was grown, how it was used - and share with you the reasons why those specific two gardens changed the course of French culinary history. 

· Botanical Politics with Dr. Julia Abramson - The Effect of French Émigrés on the Foodways of America

Julia Abramson, PhD who will further the historical discussion by bringing you into the scenario of the early French Émigrés to America and how the Emigres themselves changed the course of the American culinary experience.  

· A Sculpted Walk in the Garden with Christopher Curtis -  Art in the Outdoors

 Christopher Curtis, is a nationally recognized sculptor whose work is currently being exhibited at Tulsa Botanic Garden.

11:30 a.m.: Q & A with Keynote Speakers

12:00 p.m.: THE TASTING with Formaggio Kitchen's David Robinson
A guided journey through 
French olives, cheeses, jambon, mustards, olive oils, honeys and butters provided by Formaggio Kitchen Boston.  French baguettes and fougasse provided locally as well as fresh spring vegetables. Hard ciders will accompany. 

 


  Carolin Young is a food scholar with a focus on French culture and dining history. A long-time resident of Paris, she’s been a researcher, lecturer, and dinner curator for Sotheby’s and a long-time speaker of the Oxford Food Symposium. Her work focuses on the social and historical aspects of dining and food as a form of culture. She is widely known for her book, Apples of Gold in Settings of Silver: Stories of Dinner as a Work of Art, a journey through the menus, settings, design, experience, and historical context of twelve renowned dinner parties from the Middle Ages to the 1930s.

 Dr. Julia Abramson is an Associate Professor at University of Oklahoma and researches and teaches about essential interdisciplinary topics in the French eighteenth century and contemporary culture, food studies, and finance, economics, and culture. Her publications include Food Culture in France. Appointed by the Oklahoma Humanities Council and the Smithsonian Institution, she has served as the research scholar for a public humanities project that investigated local food histories and practices across the State of Oklahoma, to understand their relationship to national trends. She earned the B.A. in French Studies from Bryn Mawr College and Ph.D. in Romance Languages and Literatures, with a specialization in French, from Princeton University.

Christopher Curtis cut his first stone under the instruction of Paul Aschenbach at the University of Vermont. He continues to navigate the liminal space between science and art, using industrial tools for artistic means. Though Curtis’ work employs current technology, his abiding fascination is with raw stone. He has studied the geologic history of his native Vermont, following the ancient lines of glaciers and inland seas to find stones whose stories resonate with the sculptures they become.

David Robinson spent the first decade of his working life cooking in some of Boston’s finest restaurants, including Marcuccio’s and Radius, during which time he also traveled extensively through Italy and Spain. Since becoming the cheese buyer at Formaggio Kitchen South End in 2010, David has traveled extensively through Europe for his work.

Robert McKeown has worked in all aspects of the food, design, media, and hospitality industries. Cross-trained in Mobil 5-Star French kitchens, elite design studios, and cheese caves, he has served as editor-at-large and foreign correspondent for publications like Gourmet (US), and Gourmet Traveller (Oz), winning numerous awards including a nomination as World’s Best Food Journalist. He has done research and concept development for renowned chefs and hotel groups like Jean-Georges Vongerichten and W Hotels. McKeown has received grants for academic and culinary research including those from Oxford University, Kikkoman Soy Sauce, the James Beard Foundation, and the Culinary Institute of America, and regularly lectures and chairs forums and conferences about food, media, and culture in settings such as the Oxford Food Symposium. 


Limited spaces are available for The Symposium. Pre-registration required and includes valet parking, symposium, The Tasting and admission to the Garden for the day. The Symposium will be held in the J.E. and L.E. Mabee Grange at Tulsa Botanic Garden.

Registration is $200 for Garden members and $250 for non-members  

Online registration for The Symposium has closed -  For phone registration, call 918-289-0330, Monday - Friday, 8:30 a.m. - 5 p.m.

 

The Symposium at BOTANICAL!